Types of loft conversions in London

Types of loft conversions in London

Generally, there are four major types of loft conversion found in the UK in general and London in particular, with each containing subsequent pros and cons. In London homes, a loft conversion may serve as a guest bedroom, study room, or a play area for the children. For the overhaul, you should be prepared to spend up to £45,000. The money, along with the subsequent weeks, will convert your empty roof space into a loft.

Generally, there are four major types of loft conversion found in the UK in general and London in particular, with each containing subsequent pros and cons. In London homes, a loft conversion may serve as a guest bedroom, study room, or a play area for the children. For the overhaul, you should be prepared to spend up to £45,000. The money, along with the subsequent weeks, will convert your empty roof space into a loft.

You’ll require to take into account the shape and line of your roof, your budget, and development rights to decide what type of conversion will be most suitable for you. For this, you need an architect who knows his job. His professional advice will help you draw the best plans for your home in the available resources.

There are three major types of structural variations

1.  Dormer Loft Conversion

The most common type of loft conversion is a simple flat roof dormer. It’s a structural extension that projects vertically from the slope of the existing roof, creating a box shape. This form of loft conversion involves no revolutionary changes, allowing for the fixation of traditional windows.

Pros:

  • Adds useful headroom in the attic
  • Leaves straight walls and flat ceilings
  • Significantly adds internal space
  • Good light and increased ventilation
  • Cheaper compared to other choices
  • Suitable for most UK house styles
  • Usually falls under permitted development

Cons:

  • Not necessary the most aesthetically appealing overhaul

For a mid-terrace period home, an L-shaped dormer is a preferred form of conversion. This shape wraps around the side and rear of the house or property.

With an inverted “v” shaped roof, a gabled dormer can also be a popular choice. It could be a more appealing selection for the front of your home. Obviously, it’s a costly option and places limitations on the headroom.

2.  Mansard Loft Conversion

This form of conversion is built by raising the wall shared with your neighbours. In this, the roof remains flat, with one outer wall slides smoothly inwards. Mansards are usually meant for the rear of the house. Though they’re compatible for most property types, they’re most common in terraced properties.

Pros:

  • Considered as more artistic and beautiful than a dormer
  • Compatible with older houses
  • More headroom than any other adaptation
  • Tends to allow more light into your loft

Cons:

  • Almost always needs planning permission
  • Increased duration of construction
  • Costlier than other forms of loft conversion

3. Hip to Gable Loft Conversion

It's the most suitable form for the end of the terrace and detached properties. This conversion straightens an inwardly sloped end roof to form a vertical wall. This seemingly insignificant change can create a huge difference in the living space inside. It is becoming a trendy option for property owners nowadays.

Pros:

  • Aesthetically pleasing, as it fuses with the existing home
  • Can be integrated with a rear dormer loft for increased space
  • Ideal for chalets and bungalows

Cons:

  • Not suitable for mid-terrace homes
  • Costlier than a dormer conversion

However, you still have another option if you don’t want to make such a structural overhaul to your house. You can think about another alternative: a roof light loft conversion.

4.  A Roof Light Loft Conversion

This form of conversion doesn’t involve any revolutionary changes like altering or expanding your space. It only involves adding windows and making the attic into a living space.

Pros:

  • Around 25% less expensive than other forms of conversion
  • More likely to be approved in conservation areas
  • Significant space for storage

Cons:

  • Needs 2.25m of head height in the middle of the room, leaving space to build up the floor safely
  • Due to limited headroom, stairs may have to come into the middle of the room
  • May need planning permission if windows are at the front


   

       if(window.strchfSettings === undefined) window.strchfSettings = {};
   window.strchfSettings.stats = {url: "https://red-builders.storychief.io/en/types-of-loft-conversions-in-london?id=340919782&type=26",title: "Types of loft conversions in London",id: "5001cff8-79a2-4ff4-b161-e5fc28b8b199"};
           (function(d, s, id) {
     var js, sjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
     if (d.getElementById(id)) {window.strchf.update(); return;}
     js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
     js.src = "https://d37oebn0w9ir6a.cloudfront.net/scripts/v0/strchf.js";
     js.async = true;
     sjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, sjs);
   }(document, 'script', 'storychief-jssdk'))